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HBO Previews Mare of Easttown, In Treatment and More

In addition to the new adult animated series, HBO and HBO Max previewed more of their upcoming titles at the TCA Winter 2021 virtual event. Read on to learn more about Mare of Easttown, In Treatment, Tina and The Crime of the Century.

HBO Previews Mare of Easttown, In Treatment and More

MARE OF EASTTOWN

Starring Academy Award, Emmy and Golden Globe-winner Kate Winslet (HBO’s Mildred Pierce), from creator and writer Brad Ingelsby (The Way Back), with all episodes directed by Craig Zobel (HBO’s The Leftovers), the seven-part limited series Mare of Easttown, debuts Sunday, April 18 (10:00-11:00 ET/PT) on HBO and will be available to stream on HBO Max.

This limited series stars Winslet as Mare Sheehan, a small-town Pennsylvania detective who investigates a local murder as life crumbles around her. Mare of Easttown is an exploration into the dark side of a close community and an authentic examination of how family and past tragedies can define our present.

Mare of Easttown also stars Julianne Nicholson (HBO’s The Outsider) as Lori Ross, Mare’s best friend since childhood; three-time Emmy-winner Jean Smart (Emmy-nominated for HBO’s Watchmen) as Helen, Mare’s mother; Angourie Rice (Black Mirror) as Siobhan Sheehan, Mare’s teenaged daughter; Evan Peters (American Horror Story) as Detective Colin Zabel, the county detective called in to assist with Mare’s investigation; and Guy Pearce (Emmy winner and Golden Globe nominee for HBO’s Mildred Pierce) as Richard Ryan, a local creative writing professor.

Also starring are Cailee Spaeny (Devs) as Erin McMenamin, an isolated teen living with her volatile father; David Denman (Outcast) as Frank Sheehan, Mare’s ex-husband; John Douglas Thompson (HBO Max film Let Them All Talk) as Chief Carter, Mare’s boss at the Easttown Police Department; Patrick Murney (Seven Seconds) as Kenny McMenamin, Erin’s father; James McArdle (Ammonite) as Deacon Mark Burton; Sosie Bacon (HBO’s Here and Now) as Carrie Layden, Drew’s mother and Kevin’s ex-girlfriend; Joe Tippett (Rise) as John Ross, Lori’s husband and high school sweetheart; and Neal Huff (HBO’s The Wire) as Mare’s cousin, Father Dan Hastings.

IN TREATMENT

The Emmy-winning drama series In Treatment returns for its fourth season this May on HBO and will be available to stream on HBO Max. Emmy winner Uzo Aduba (Mrs. America, Orange Is the New Black) will play the lead role of the therapist at the center of the season, as the observant, empathetic Dr. Brooke Taylor.

The reimagining of the series is set in present-day Los Angeles and brings a diverse trio of patients in session with Brooke to help navigate a variety of modern concerns. Issues such as the global pandemic and recent major social and cultural shifts are a backdrop to the work Brooke will undertake — all while she deals with complications in her own personal life.

In Treatment also stars Anthony Ramos (Hamilton) as Eladio, who works as a home health aide for a wealthy family’s adult son; Liza Colón-Zayas (David Makes Man) as Rita, Brooke’s longtime confidant and friend who supports Brooke as she contends with her own demons after a life-altering loss; and John Benjamin Hickey (Jessica Jones) as Colin, a charming millionaire beach bum turned white-collar criminal reckoning with all the ways his life has changed following his recent release from prison.

The cast also includes Quintessa Swindell (Euphoria) as Laila, Brooke’s distrustful, teenage client, struggling to carve out her own identity separate from her family’s overbearing expectations; and Joel Kinnaman (For All Mankind) as Adam, Brooke’s long-time on-again, off-again boyfriend who has resurfaced to create further complexity for her.

In Treatment originally debuted on HBO in 2008, running for three seasons starring Gabriel Byrne and Dianne Wiest. The Emmy-winning series also garnered Peabody and AFI Awards wins.

In Treatment is produced by HBO Entertainment. The executive producers are Stephen Levinson, Mark Wahlberg, Hagai Levi, Jennifer Schuur, Joshua Allen and Melissa Bernstein. Joanne Toll and Noa Tishby serve as co-executive producers. The series is produced in association with Leverage, Closest to the Hole Productions and Sheleg.

TINA

HBO’s Tina, a feature documentary from Academy Award-winning directors Dan Lindsay, T.J. Martin and Lightbox, the production company founded by Academy Award-winning producer Simon Chinn and Emmy-winning producer Jonathan Chinn, together with Emmy-nominated producer Diane Becker, is a revealing and intimate look at the life and career of musical icon Tina Turner, charting her improbable rise to early fame, her personal and professional struggles throughout her life and her even more improbable resurgence as a global phenomenon in the 1980s.

The documentary debuts Saturday, March 27 (8:00 PM- 10:00 PM ET/PT) on HBO and will be available to stream on HBO Max.

This unvarnished, dynamic account features insightful interviews with Tina herself, conducted in her hometown of Zurich, Switzerland, and with those closest to her. It also features a wealth of never-before-seen footage, audio tapes and personal photos, telling a deep and absorbing story about the queen of rock ‘n’ roll in all its complexity.

In the fall of 1981, struggling to gain meaningful momentum in her career, Tina Turner sat for an interview with Carl Arrington, the music editor of People Magazine. Five years earlier, she had filed for divorce from Ike Turner, her husband and musical partner for over 16 years. Together they had climbed the charts and made musical history with their hits “A Fool in Love”, “River Deep – Mountain High” and “Proud Mary”. Off stage, they appeared to have a healthy marriage and family life.

The story she would tell Carl was an honest and harrowing account of the abuse and torture she had suffered through during her marriage, and the brave escape she made after years of trauma. The article would be the first of many profiles that would cement Tina’s image as a survivor, helping to fuel the story of her extraordinary yet improbable career comeback.

Having lost everything but her name in the divorce, Tina spent several years in Las Vegas, performing in cabaret clubs and appearing on television variety shows. In 1983, at the age of forty-four, she recorded the album “Private Dancer” in just two weeks and it quickly became a commercial and critical sensation. Her single “What’s Love Got To Do With It” became her first and only number one hit on the Billboard 100 charts.

Tina 2.0 had arrived. “Private Dancer” sold over 12 million copies worldwide and cemented Tina as a bona fide superstar. She performed with Mick Jagger at LiveAid, won a slew of Grammys and wrote a best-selling autobiography, “I, Tina.” In 1988, Tina performed to a record-breaking crowd of 180,000 people in Brazil. By 1993, a feature film was made about her life, starring Angela Bassett as Tina herself. As her fame grew, so did her identity as a cultural symbol, becoming a representation of strength and resilience to her fans. Privately, she wrestled with the survivor narrative that shaped her later life and career and struggled to be released from her past.

In addition to a stunning amount of archival footage spanning 60 years, the documentary includes interviews with Angela Bassett; Oprah Winfrey; journalist Kurt Loder who co-authored “I, Tina,” which inspired the feature film; playwright Katori Hall, who scribed “Tina – The Tina Turner Musical”; and husband and former record executive Erwin Bach, among many others.

Tina draws to an emotional conclusion with Tina Turner taking a bow at the opening night of the Broadway musical about her life, a fitting swan song for an immensely talented performer who courageously spoke her truth about domestic abuse, and refused to let age, gender or a difficult past stand in her way. Tina is a celebration of Tina Turner’s immense talent, improbable journey to global stardom and her own embrace of her status as a beloved and respected survivor.

THE CRIME OF THE CENTURY

HBO’s The Crime of the Century, a two-part documentary directed by Emmy and Academy Award winner Alex Gibney (HBO’s The Inventor: Out for Blood in Silicon Valley, Going Clear: Scientology & the Prison of Belief), is a searing indictment of Big Pharma and the political operatives and government regulations that enable over-production, reckless distribution and abuse of synthetic opiates. Exploring the origins, extent and fallout of one of the most devastating public health tragedies of our time, with half a million deaths from overdoses this century alone, the film reveals that America’s opioid epidemic is not a public health crisis that came out of nowhere.

With the help of whistleblowers, insiders, newly-leaked documents, exclusive interviews and access to behind-the-scenes investigations, and featuring expert input from medical professionals, journalists, former and current government agents, attorneys and pharmaceutical sales representatives, as well as sobering testimony from victims of opioid addiction, Gibney’s exposé posits that drug companies are in fact largely responsible for manufacturing the very crisis they profit from, to the tune of billions of dollars…and thousands of lives.

The Crime of the Century will debut on HBO and be available to stream on HBO Max this May.

The opioid crisis has resulted in a country ravaged by corporate greed and betrayed by some of its own elected officials, following the aggressive promotion of OxyContin, a highly addictive drug from family owned pharmaceutical giant, Purdue Pharma. Purdue worked closely with the FDA to get the highly profitable pain medication approved for wider use, promoting its safety without sufficient evidence, and creating a campaign to redefine pain and how we treat it. When government regulators or Justice Department officials tried to mitigate the wrongdoing, Purdue Pharma and companies like Cardinal-Health that were huge opioid distributors would settle the cases, keep the details private and continue on unabated. As tens of thousands of people succumbed to opioid addiction, the fortunes built by the opiate business became the crime of the century, and the market that OxyContin had opened paved the way for even deadlier prescription drugs.

Contributing to Part One of The Crime of the Century are: author Patrick Radden Keefe; opioid specialist Dr. Andrew Kolodny; former Purdue sales rep. Mark Ross; addiction specialist Dr. Anne Lembke; Life Tree pain clinic founder Dr. Lynn Webster; Roy Bosley, whose wife died of an opioid overdose; author and NY Times reporter Barry Meier; primary care physician Dr. Art Van Zee; former Department of Justice official Paul Pelletier; and EMT Giles Sartin.

Part Two of The Crime of the Century shines a spotlight on the mass marketing of the synthetic opioid fentanyl and examines the connections between drug manufacturers and government policy. While America’s silent epidemic was killing 40 people a day, Insys Therapeutics, an upstart opioid manufacturer of fentanyl, continued to bribe doctors to overprescribe. Startling video of sales retreats and promotional material speak to a deep cynicism among company employees and a disregard for the widespread, nefarious corporate practices. A complex scheme to defraud the insurance companies existed side by side with fraudulent marketing tactics while lawmakers continued to turn a blind eye to the implications of a complex pipeline that delivers billions of pills around the country.

Interweaving stories of personal tragedy from first responders, survivors and family members of opioid victims with the timeline of corporate greed and malfeasance, Part Two of The Crime of the Century includes insights from former DEA agent Joe Rannazzisi; former DEA attorney Jonathan Novak; Washington Post reporters Sari Horwitz, Scott Higham, Lenny Bernstein; Assistant U.S. Attorneys for Massachusetts David Lazarus, Nathaniel Yeager and Fred Wyshak; former V.P. of Sales at Insys Alec Burlakoff; former Insys regional sales manager Sunrise Lee; and fentanyl dealer Sidney Caleb Lanier. Woven together, the character-driven stories form a larger narrative of shocking corruption.

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